Courses and Syllabi

ESGE 3038 Writing as Discourse, Reflection and Reasoning: the Essay (3 credits) Using the Writing Process Approach (WPA), this course takes a critical look at dominant discourses, those uses and practices of language that hold ideological leadership and powerfully influence our perception of reality. The purpose of this analysis is to unmask the relationship between language, cognition and social practice. It is an interdisciplinary course that integrates literature, linguistics, cognitive sciences and other disciplines in order to pursue discourse analysis. The WPA leads students to reflect upon writing as a process of refining thinking through conscious awareness of the social discourses underlying their language practices. Students will be required to document all sources used (print and electronic) that are cited in their papers. Syllabus

INGL 3161 Intensive Basic English I (3 credits) Students at this level range between mid-beginning to low intermediate levels based on the proficiency guidelines from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). This course fulfills the English requirement for the general education component. It is designed for students to develop the basic English language competencies for understanding academic texts and communicating ideas orally and in writing at an intelligible level. This English for Academic Purposes course provides students with conversational and writing competencies. Using nonfictional selections with an interdisciplinary thematic content as the focus of discussion, oral and critical thinking skills are fostered. Writing reinforces listening, speaking, and reading competencies so that students can express ideas through the thoughtful articulation of vocabulary and grammar. This course is taken concurrently with Intensive Basic English Laboratory I. Syllabus

INGL 3162 Intensive Basic English II (3 credits) Students at this level range between mid-beginning to low intermediate levels based on the proficiency guidelines from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). This course fulfills the English requirement for the general education component. This course further develops the basic linguistic and critical thinking competencies introduced in INGL 3161. In this English for Academic Purposes course, emphasis is placed on the integration of competencies for meaningful communication of ideas around interconnected themes. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing competencies are integrated and reinforced through the reading and analysis of short stories. The class discussion of these fictional selections provides the context to develop vocabulary, invite interaction, and engage students in sharing ideas through the writing of essays. This course is taken concurrently with Intensive Basic English Laboratory II. Syllabus

INGL 3101: Basic English I (3 credits) This course presents an integrated literature approach focused on the study of multidisciplinary content. It includes reading comprehension and critical analysis, the development of language competencies, basic writing, and research skills. Additional supplementary readings are also encouraged. The first semester covers the study of the content and form of essays, as well as other non-fictional readings. The second semester includes the study of the content and form of short stories. Complementary readings may include short novels to enrich this course. Students are encouraged to participate in non-credit intensive workshops in reading, writing, and conversational English in order to improve their ability to communicate in English. Syllabus

INGL 3102: Basic English II (3 credits) This course presents an integrated literature approach focused on the study of multidisciplinary content. It includes reading comprehension and critical analysis, the development of language competencies, basic writing, and research skills. Additional supplementary readings are also encouraged. The first semester covers the study of the content and form of essays, as well as other non-fictional readings. The second semester includes the study of the content and form of short stories. Complementary readings may include short novels to enrich this course. Students are encouraged to participate in non-credit intensive workshops in reading, writing, and conversational English in order to improve their ability to communicate in English. Syllabus

INGL 3103: Intermediate English I (3 credits) The Intermediate Level Course aims to develop the students’ proficiency in the study and analysis of various literary genres in terms of their content and form. Supplementary reading is required during both semesters. The course also seeks to provide the students with the necessary tools to improve and develop essay-writing skills. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in the intensive writing workshops offered within our department: Creative Writing and Writing About Literature. The first semester (English 3103) aims to develop interpretive – analytical skills through the study of the essay. Syllabus

INGL 3104: Intermediate English II (3 credits) The Intermediate Level Course aims to develop the students’ proficiency in the study and analysis of various literary genres in terms of their content and form. Supplementary reading is required during both semesters. The course also seeks to provide the students with the necessary tools to improve and develop essay-writing skills. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in the intensive writing workshops offered within our department: Creative Writing and Writing About Literature. The second semester (English 3104) focuses on the development of skills in the reading and literary analysis of fiction; emphasis is given to the study of the short story. Students are guided to critically examine aesthetic, ethical, humanistic and cultural values in the literary works studied. Selections are critically analyzed and discussed utilizing an interdisciplinary approach perspective. Syllabus

INGL 3011: Honors English I (3 credits) The course consists of the study and analysis of works of fiction, drama, [theater]and poetry using the elements and terminology essential to the critical examination of the pertinent genres. Moreover, Honors English promotes an appreciation of literature as a means of conveying human experience and as a source of enjoyment and life-long learning; it also promotes the use of literature as an intellectual tool in the analysis of reality. At the end of this course, students should be able to discuss and write about engaging works of art by seminal authors in an academically knowledgeable and coherent manner. Syllabus

INGL 3012: Honors English II (3 credits) The course consists of the study and analysis of works of fiction, drama, [theater]and poetry using the elements and terminology essential to the critical examination of the pertinent genres. Moreover, Honors English promotes an appreciation of literature as a means of conveying human experience and as a source of enjoyment and life-long learning; it also promotes the use of literature as an intellectual tool in the analysis of reality. At the end of this course, students should be able to discuss and write about engaging works of art by seminal authors in an academically knowledgeable and coherent manner. Syllabus

INGL 3123: Computer Assisted Academic Writing I (3 credits) Its aim is to introduce students to the writing, reading, and reasoning skills necessary for success in university courses. The initial focus of the course is active reading. Extensive use of the computer facilitates the process of writing; writing becomes easier because the computer allows multiple revisions of a paper to be produced and reviewed repeatedly. By the end of the first semester, students will be able to write analytical essays for courses in the social sciences, natural sciences and the humanities. Syllabus

INGL 3124: Computer Assisted Academic Writing II (3 credits) Its aim is to introduce students to the writing, reading, and reasoning skills necessary for success in university courses. The initial focus of the course is active reading. Extensive use of the computer facilitates the process of writing; writing becomes easier because the computer allows multiple revisions of a paper to be produced and reviewed repeatedly. During the second semester, students select an academic controversy and develop that debate or issue into a persuasive research paper that supports a clear argument. The support for this argumentative paper will come from library research. Students will learn how to use the computer to find relevant books and articles, compile information from these sources and organize it into a coherent convincing essay. Syllabus

INGL 3150: Literature of Crime (3 credits) This course is an option for completing the literature requirement of the general education component. This course will focus on true crime; representations of crime in popular culture; literary works in which a crime is central; sensational crimes; crimes against humanity; political and financial crimes; crimes related to race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and sexual orientation, and socioeconomic and undocumented status, among others. Because crimes are, by definition, transgressions, they serve to highlight what is at the heart of a particular culture or society. Writing focused on crime thus helps us to understand not only what tears communities and societies apart, but also what holds them together. This course is interdisciplinary in focus, drawing from any and/or all of the following modes of critique: literary analysis, cultural studies, history, the law, psychology, and the social sciences. Syllabus

INGL 3151: The Human Condition in Literature I: An interdisciplinary Approach (3 credits) This is a two-semester course for students who have scored 4 or higher on the Advanced Placement test, and demonstrated competence in writing in a short composition produced in the first week of school. The course satisfies the second year English requirement. Within selected themes, The Human Condition in Literature submits issues, such as the problems and value conflicts of life as seen in fiction and non-fiction, to critical analysis from such diverse vantage points as history, philosophy, politics and psychology. In the course, reading is the primary resource for writing; students write from literature. They use texts to produce texts. A library research paper is required in the second semester. Currently, the first semester themes deal with love and identity; in the second semester, the themes are alienation and ethics. Syllabus

INGL 3152: The Human Condition in Literature II: An Interdisciplinary Approach (3 credits) This is a two-semester course for students who have scored 4 or higher on the Advanced Placement test, and demonstrated competence in writing in a short composition produced in the first week of school. The course satisfies the second year English requirement. Within selected themes, The Human Condition in Literature submits issues, such as the problems and value conflicts of life as seen in fiction and non-fiction, to critical analysis from such diverse vantage points as history, philosophy, politics and psychology. In the course, reading is the primary resource for writing; students write from literature. They use texts to produce texts. A library research paper is required in the second semester. Currently, the first semester themes deal with love and identity; in the second semester, the themes are alienation and ethics. Syllabus

INGL 3135: The Journey in Literature (3 credits) This course is an option for completing the literature requirement of the general education component. The course analyzes the travel narrative in a variety of texts, including fiction, non-fiction, prose, drama, film, and poetry, to understand the relationship between these works and themes of self-discovery, cultural identify, personal achievement, and a search for meaning. Students and the professor will look at the master narratives of the journey in literary texts as a window into various issues. The course can be altered to emphasize particular geographic sites, types of journeys, a specific theme related to the journey, or representations of journey in a specific genre. The professor will use one or several of the following focuses: scientific discovery, gender, sexual preference, personal and national identity, race, colonialism, post-colonialism and philosophy. Syllabus

INGL 3211: Advanced English I (3 credits) An introduction to the experience, interpretation, and evaluation of literature. Reading and writing assignments will focus on short fiction, modern drama, the elements of poetry, and the essay. Fundamental library skills related to literary study will be introduced. Syllabus

INGL 3212: Advanced English II (3 credits) This course will emphasize the development of reading, discussion, and writing skills through the experience, interpretation and evaluation of the novel; Shakespearean drama, and the complex texture of poetry. A research paper related to literary study will be required. Syllabus

INGL 3270: Building Research Projects (3 credits) This English for Academic Purposes course is designed for second year students. This class offers the Basic English population an option for completing an English elective and/or General Education bachelor’s program elective component. This course initiates students in formal academic writing and introduces essential research competencies. Readings for this course are on interdisciplinary topics.  This course strengthens a critical response and reasoned point of view as a basis for argument in order to prepare them for discourses inside and outside of academia. Syllabus

INGL 3297: Women of Color Writers in English (3 credits) This course is an option for completing the literature requirement of the general education component. The course focuses on women of color, such as but not limited to African American, Native American, Asian American, and Latina/Chicana, writers and how they express themselves in a variety of texts. The course explores questions of identity formation and/or disintegration and how they are rooted in issues of race, gender, social status, history, community, economics, and generational conflict Critical reading in different genres demonstrates where these women of color writers fit into the canon of work written in the English language and to see how their texts have an interdisciplinary, transcultural, and multicultural focus. The course also assesses the significance and role of the writings as part of women’s literature, feminist literary theory, and critical race theory. Information literacy competences are an essential component of this course. Syllabus

INGL 4003: Caribbean Cities in Spacetime (3 credits) This course is an option for completing the literature requirement of the general education component. It provides an introduction to the emergence of Caribbean cities in the spacetime of narrative-essay, novel, short story, poetry, film, calypso, alongside reports of contraband, piracy, and dubious settlers. It has both content and language objectives. Content- to explore cities in the English-speaking Caribbean through texts, and Language- to enhance oral, listening, reading, and writing competencies in English. Students take a literary voyage from indigenous homes to plantation manors, canoes to sailing vessels, dirt roads to bridges across islands. Through the literature, students discover developing cities, dwellings, architectural features, seascapes and landscapes. The language framework is English for academic purposes (EAC), specifically content-based instruction (CBI). Syllabus